Author Topic: Scanning or photographing long planks  (Read 698 times)

2019-04-29, 05:13:47

danio1011

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Hi all,

We have a project that requires the representation of some specific wood planks for use with floorgenerator script and Corona.  The manufacturer sent us ~50 SF of samples consisting of 6’ long planks.  We tried photographing with a dSLR in ‘one shot’ with a wide angle lens but didn’t get enough resolution.  We tried multiple shots but that creates a tricky merge situation with exposure and grain being tricky to match precisely.

I was curious if anyone had any thoughts?  It’s almost like an iPhone app would do the job...we don’t need a ton of data since they won’t be close to the camera and the grain is not raised so I don’t think something like Dabarti capture is necessary either.  Just looking for a smart way to get reasonable resolution and continuity without resorting to a specialty scanner.

Apologies in advance if this doesn’t fit in ‘General.’

Thanks!
Daniel

2019-04-29, 07:52:57
Reply #1

burnin

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... We tried multiple shots but that creates a tricky merge situation with exposure and grain being tricky to match precisely....
When you take multiple shots to merge, use/set manual settings for all shots to have same specs (ISO, aperture, shutter, focal length, lighting conditions...). Basically as you would do shooting for photogrammetry.

2019-04-29, 08:39:17
Reply #2

dzintas

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I already hear Dubcat somewhere, screaming in my mind for suggesting this, but here it goes.

There was a guy, at my local forum, who uses handheld scanner for most of his textures. Maybe that's worth looking into?
You won't get great color accuracy and most likely will need to stitch texture files later, and who knows what other plethora of problems this could introduce.
But handheld scanners don't cost that much, and this could work.

2019-04-29, 10:13:36
Reply #3

HVB

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use manual setting on your camera to keep exposure the same on every photo. Also you could add some small marks like colored dots or something so photoshop can match them easily automatic. those you can edit out later when the photos are merged together.

2019-04-29, 10:21:06
Reply #4

romullus

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  • Let's move this topic, shall we?
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Sharpest normal angle prime lens that you have, polarizing filter if you have one, diffuse lighting, manual camera settings, apperture closed down to lens' sweet spot, lowest ISO, manual WB, tripod, self timer and/or release cable, pictures with lots of overlap (at least 50%) and photoshop photomerge or ptgui, hugin. Should give you really good result.
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2019-04-29, 17:05:25
Reply #5

danio1011

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Thanks for the feedback, everyone.  I had tried photomerge but establishing benchmarks on the boards is a great idea.  All very helpful suggestions, thanks again for the quick responses!
Daniel