Author Topic: Case Study House #28  (Read 4593 times)

2016-02-01, 14:49:34

ikercito

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Hello everyone,

It's the first time I post a WIP, I'm really looking forward to your comments.

This is a personal project I'm developing now that I have a couple weeks away from work. I usually work exclusively on interior scenes, although I'm trying to tackle exterior scenes to get more confidence.

This project is based around the Case Study House #28 built in 1955-56 designed by architects Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman. The house is huge (around 4000 sq ft!) and for now I have just developed the general structure, the area around the swimming pool and the living room. It's being quite difficult to find (I'm a really bad modeler) proper furniture, as I'm trying to retain the original look of the house, based on pictures I've found around the net. There are still many areas that I haven't started working on yet, so excuse the blanks.

I hope you all like it, I'll be very grateful to hear your comments.

(I'll be posting a couple of exterior shots by the pool area very soon)

2016-02-01, 16:18:51
Reply #1

maru

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Hi, I don't really have experience in this field, but just as a regular observer I would say that:
-there is very strong contrast between the interior and exterior - it looks like it's very bright outside, and very dark inside - some post processing can probably change that
-everything looks too perfect to be real - all the edges are straight, all the bricks are in straight lines, maybe it's supposed to be like this, but I find it distracting

2016-02-01, 17:17:34
Reply #2

ikercito

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Thanks for your comments Maru. You're completely right about both things.

- The contrast, I have not compensated it yet on purpose. I first wanted to get the natural light correctly set up, and I think there's still a lot of improvement to be done. I personally don't like compensating the indoor/outdoor balance too much, as I feel it's more natural and real looking, but yes... I should improve that anyway.

- I've spent several hours trying to dirty up the scene, give it some variance and grittiness. I guess I still have to work more on that!

My two main concerns right now are the glass material, and the lack of environment. I'm not sure how to tackle the glass to give it some "reality", it's too perfect and clean right now. I guess I'll have to tweak the dials a bit more and perhaps add some maps to reflection/refraction (and bump?) to get some grit on them. And the environment is going to take a while to build... I'll start with the rest of stuff first.

If you want to check the real house, here's a link with some pics (you'll see that the bricks are quite straight and clean looking) :)
http://www.midcenturyhome.com/case-study-house-28-buff-smith-and-hensman/

Thanks for your help

2016-02-01, 18:03:40
Reply #3

ikercito

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Here are the two exterior shots. Still lots of work to do, any tips? :)

2016-02-01, 19:47:31
Reply #4

romullus

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I will never understand how people can actually live in places like that. House construction looks massive, cold and depressing...
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2016-02-01, 21:40:42
Reply #5

ikercito

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I managed to get a floorplan for the house, but no elevation info whatsoever... Might be my mistake? :(

Any tips on the scene romullus?

2016-02-01, 23:10:59
Reply #6

romullus

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Sorry, i don't have any advice about your scene. I just wanted to express my opinion about that "concrete and bricks all the way" type of architecture...
I'm not Corona Team member. Everything i say, is my personal opinion only.
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2016-02-10, 23:25:47
Reply #7

ikercito

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Some updates regarding lighting, materials, vegetation and environment. Still not sure which way to take tonemapping, I've been testing a few different things...

Hope you like it, any comments are welcome!


2020-06-27, 12:09:51
Reply #8

Buzzz

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Very nice, look well!

2020-06-30, 04:22:49
Reply #9

cjwidd

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My 2¢ is that the materials need a lot more attention, especially the brick.
There are a lot of perfectly straight edges (e.g. pool, carpet, fireplace, windows, tiles, etc.) that can be distracting in terms of naturalness
Not enough height variation for the indoor floor tiles
No baseboards where the floor meets the wall; no break in the joint of the surface

2020-06-30, 10:24:21
Reply #10

romullus

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The work is four and a half years old now. There's probably not much sense in giving the advices about materials ;]
I'm not Corona Team member. Everything i say, is my personal opinion only.
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2020-06-30, 13:01:25
Reply #11

cjwidd

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What I get for not checking the date - sorry about that lol