Author Topic: Virtual Whiskey Shoot  (Read 456 times)

2022-11-28, 01:14:01

BigAl3D

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Set up this virtual product shot. Modeled everything myself in Cinema 4D, although the bottle is not an exact replica. I'd say the ice and liquid are an area that need a little love for realism, but over all I like this result.

2022-11-28, 09:47:20
Reply #1

romullus

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I think there's something wrong with your liquid setup - it doesn't look like it would refract light rays at all.
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2022-11-28, 13:44:20
Reply #2

Beanzvision

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Here's a great article that might help you with this :)
https://blog.corona-renderer.com/whisky-galore-david-turfitts-work-in-cinema-4d/
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2022-11-28, 17:02:43
Reply #3

BigAl3D

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Feel free to move this thread to another section since this has turned into a how can I improve this image, which is great.

Soon after posting, I kept looking at the ice and knew that was a problem. I think this render is much better. The main differences are the material on the ice was scaled up and uses less displacement. I have a light focused on the ice to brighten it up a bit, but it was too bright and the refraction went nuts. I also switched the Reflections Override with a monotone studio light image.

I was already rendering this before I quickly glanced at that article you posted. His liquid settings are basically default minus the color thing with the neck. The most obvious thing Corona is not creating since the liquid is a hard line against the glass is the way liquid creeps up the side making additional refraction effects. In a still image, that can be faked in Photoshop obviously. My liquid actually has a little more refraction than his in the article. I rendered a test with just the liquid and it it most certainly refracting.

Appreciate the feedback though.
« Last Edit: 2022-11-28, 17:07:30 by BigAl3D »