Author Topic: WIP - Exhibition stands rendering scenarios  (Read 1312 times)

2020-03-11, 10:26:37

mfcb

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Hello,
I've been working for a few years designing exhibition stands, and I'm feeling that I'm kind of stuck. My feeling is that the I can't go further even trying different lighting setups.
Images have to be very clean and aseptic.

I don't know if its because the lack of a backplate / 3D scenario. I haven't found one to place the stands inside that convinces me (for free of course, because my company is not going to "waste" money in this...)

Actually I work with a general HDRI of a cloudy day, and try to highlight with some rectangle lights. The backplate is a ciclorama matte with  a CoronaRaySwitch material to avoid having reflections and refractions of the HDRI (or at least it was my initial intentions, because I ended having weird refletions on the aluminum of the hanging structure, glass, etc.)

Sometimes I add some internal lights of the exhibition stand, others I prefer to avoid overloading the scene with tons of lights, and just use coronalight mtl without emiting light.

My workflow goes through pulze scene manager, having a light setup for each view. I've never go over 1920 x 1400 resolution and 3px noise level limit. Normally I just postprocess a bit in the corona image editor with some luts, curves and effects.

Lately I've been using some megascans materials, trying to simplify the material editing process to be able to work faster. Sometimes I have to fake some materials to be understandable by the clients, like metals (going plain grey...), because with light reflections they seem to be white and in my boss opinion it's just my who can tell it's a metal by the reflections.

I'm just questioning myself which can be the next step, what would you recommend me to got a bit further?
Thank you for your help, and if I can solve any doubt please feel freee to ask.






2020-03-11, 10:32:44
Reply #1

Jpjapers

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Why not build yourself an environment and render out a HDRI? You have hundreds of models of previous projects youve worked on and all you need is to build the exhibition space and light it properly. The lighting isnt very dynamic and is very flat. Better lighting would massively improve the look of materials and the forms within the exhibition space.

I worked somewhere for years where the 3d wasnt the thing they were selling and it was more for showing a concept, And they usually dont care about visual quality and just want you to churn out flat renders. If youre really keen on improving the workflow, maybe take your own time and make one of the models look as great as you possibly can with your own environment and lighting and show them how much better you can make them look and how much more visually pleasing they will be to a client without their arbitrary image guidelines restricting your output.
« Last Edit: 2020-03-11, 10:37:43 by Jpjapers »

2020-03-11, 10:39:31
Reply #2

mfcb

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I think the same about the plain light but I can't get rid of it using different lighting setups, in the end the result is the same. Maybe it's because unconsciently I try myself to light in the way that the client can't confuse any material (I mean If you sea a white wall in the front and it's same color in the side but it's a bit darker/greyish because of lighting this is a "problem" in words of my employer.

About the scenario, I try to avoid getting the attention out of the exhibition stand, and focus mainly in it, probably I can get around this with accent light inside a big scene.

Thank you!

2020-03-11, 10:43:33
Reply #3

maru

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I think exhibition design is not getting the attention it deserves (compared to "living space" visualizations like interiors). Most of them have a similar feeling and it's also the case here. I am guessing this is because of the issues mentioned here: client's requirements vs sterile look vs what the artist would like to express.

If you are to follow the rules, then I am afraid there isn't much that could be improved. This is just the expected look and it's correct.

If you are allowed to break the rules a little bit, then I would suggest: getting rid of the over-burnt areas (here), adding more structure to the materials (currently they look very flat, CGish, lack subtle noise, scratches), changing colors and temperatures of lights - LightMix could help with that.

If you are allowed to go crazy and break all rules, then you could try with some of the things you mentioned - adding some environment or at least a backplate. How about an old factory interior? Or maybe dark, volumetric fog with light beams in it, Blade Runner style? Or maybe a sterile look, but more similar to art galleries or museums?

Note that I don't really have experience in this field so technically I'm not qualified to give such advice, just sharing my thoughts. :)

2020-03-11, 11:25:29
Reply #4

Jpjapers

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I think the same about the plain light but I can't get rid of it using different lighting setups, in the end the result is the same. Maybe it's because unconsciently I try myself to light in the way that the client can't confuse any material (I mean If you sea a white wall in the front and it's same color in the side but it's a bit darker/greyish because of lighting this is a "problem" in words of my employer.

About the scenario, I try to avoid getting the attention out of the exhibition stand, and focus mainly in it, probably I can get around this with accent light inside a big scene.

Thank you!

Unfortunately your employer is the problem here if they don't realise that surfaces have shadows and tonal variances. Ive had that in a few places and it doesnt really ever go away regardless of how well versed they are in CGI. I worked in retail design for years and this was sometimes an issue. Its usually because they dont believe that CGI can look photorealistic.

You can keep the focus on your stand by using good composition and making the background less saturated and more bland than the exhibition stand youre trying to sell making it literally stand out from the crowd. Id honestly take it upon yourself to make your images look as good as you can, in your own time. Then present back to your employer.

I agree with Maru that exhibition design could be a great industry with really cool renders and its an industry i've thought about going into a few times in the past. Its a shame that this visual disparity problem is industry agnostic.
« Last Edit: 2020-03-11, 11:32:31 by Jpjapers »

2020-03-11, 12:58:09
Reply #5

mfcb

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Thank you Maru & Jpjapers for your advices, I'll try to implement some changes, backplate, lighting and a bit more of detail in the materials mixed with some volumetric fog in the background. And maybe I'll go a bit crazy :)

2020-03-11, 13:57:14
Reply #6

Jpjapers

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Thank you Maru & Jpjapers for your advices, I'll try to implement some changes, backplate, lighting and a bit more of detail in the materials mixed with some volumetric fog in the background. And maybe I'll go a bit crazy :)

Have fun and play around to see what sort of image gives you some satisfaction. It is art after all!