Author Topic: Classical apartment product showcase  (Read 13417 times)

2018-04-03, 20:05:54

Juraj

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Howdy :- ). Haven't posted any work for almost a year. We have done in fact, many in meantime, but the most interesting ones are under NDA and other, bit bland ;- ).
But I am very proud of this one. Small in scope and done for nice architectural duo AlexAllen, we were commissioned by them to create classsical apartment and render their beautiful Lightnings and design products.

I am hotlinking these images from Behance, I wonder if that will prove problematic but it's such a pain to upload to Corona otherwise.

Much better to just watch it there directly ;- ) http://bit.ly/alexallen




















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2018-04-03, 22:29:42
Reply #1

rambambulli

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Breathtaking.....

Lighting is so nice as always.

Do you want to explain hoe you achieved it?

Thanks.

2018-04-04, 09:33:30
Reply #2

mase

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Nothing much to say except magnificent as always, Juraj. Your work always inspires me create as well as step up my 3D game, hehe.

As always we will all want to see the breakdown of these images but I'm particularly interested in seeing raw renders. Any chance we can get a glimpse in any of these beauties before entering post? :)

2018-04-04, 09:44:30
Reply #3

NicolasC

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Beautiful, indeed !
It would be great to have some breakdown ;)

Keep up the great work !
Nicolas Caplat
CG supervisor / teacher / artist

2018-04-04, 11:37:47
Reply #4

Juraj

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Thank you guys.

You might be bit disappointed on seeing the raw renders for these :- ). There is very much not much going on..
It's very much just a curve in framebuffer, lot of contrast, and some tiny selective bits in CameraRaw (to give the background little bit of color tint because I wasn't using rendered fog). (I don't know why, I am still afraid of using it).

The light is little bit more interesting, and I would suggest my cgarchitect article for it :- ).
Particularly, I did use an HDRi this time. Which one I based it on is very unimportant because I modified about it anything I could, and made about 20 versions. Almost made a flexible HDRi shader, that behaves like Sun/Sky system :- ). I will write on that one soon enough.
The more important thing was I wanted lighting that was half between interesting/dramatic and mellow. Too interesting would take away attention from the products, too mellow/diffuse would make big white space like this look too flat.
So I made one that is half-between overcast sky and sunny/overcast, when the sun hides behind the clouds, and become both bigger (casting softer shadows) and neutralized (the clouds make the sun color much colder), lessening the contrast between direct and indirect light.
In the end, I modified how long I want those shadows to be, stretching reality tiny bit but without going overboard, so it would still behave like natural Sky light.

I used only single light source for every of the images except for Bedroom, where I placed one more spotlight aimed at the table/stool. The spotlight is directional and sort of extends the Skylight further.
It's there I realized how much I still have to learn about using these sort of "Set lights" because I had quite some trouble blending it in. This might be a science of its own.

Otherwise, just few classic tricks like placing blocking black walls if I wanted to taper the light and emphasise the direction.

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2018-04-04, 12:31:32
Reply #5

mase

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The light is little bit more interesting, and I would suggest my cgarchitect article for it :- ).

Is it the one called 'Finding your look'? If so it was an interesting read and I definitely agree with you that in archviz the light requires way more conceptual thinking rather than the technical one.

Otherwise, just few classic tricks like placing blocking black walls if I wanted to taper the light and emphasise the direction.

This in itself is a discovery to me. So simple yet so effective.

2018-04-04, 12:44:40
Reply #6

ts_berlin

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Hi Juraj,
a Tutorial would be nice....

Thx Thomas

2018-04-04, 13:10:41
Reply #7

Juraj

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Otherwise, just few classic tricks like placing blocking black walls if I wanted to taper the light and emphasise the direction.

This in itself is a discovery to me. So simple yet so effective.

Indeed :- ) The simplest measures are often the best. But it requires great deal of experience, imagination and... try&tweaks to apply.

There is lot of resources in photography world how to modulate light. It's harder to find how they do it in architectural work, because that's very small niche. Some exception to this is american real-estate photography but I am not big fan of that style ("just point flashlight everywhere so there is no shadows at all").
But the people who shoot catalogues for Poliform,etc.. those keep their secrets rather well.

But the techniques are quite universal and what applies to portraits, does sort of apply to furniture too :- ). So we can extrapolate from that.
I actually regret a lot not spending my early time in 3D building this sort of foundation, how to use spotlights, softboxes, bounce cards etc. So for me, it's slow rediscovery too.

But the block/bounce cards/walls is very effective thing. It's subtle..but has a lot of depth, it can't be simulated in post-production because it just affects everything, including reflection.

In this series, I used it in mainly in the kitchens, behind a camera. I needed a broad light to illuminate the middle of the room, where the island lies, but this washed away the flooring and we never want the front part of image to be the brightest when our focus point was in the middle.

So I would find the best angle, one that gives me nicest broad illumination, but also interesting shadows on volumes and lastly, revealing texture. And then I would slightly tweak and modulate the light with external factors like the block/bounce cards.Or a tree outside :- ) Anything works. It's very iterative work.


Hi Juraj,
a Tutorial would be nice....

Thx Thomas

I think the floor might be fun to show :- ).
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2018-04-04, 13:44:12
Reply #8

jellyjuice

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Really nice images love the lighting!

2018-04-04, 13:53:56
Reply #9

-Ben-Battler-

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As said above, really stunning imagery! Congrats to this achievement!

I actually regret a lot not spending my early time in 3D building this sort of foundation, how to use spotlights, softboxes, bounce cards etc. So for me, it's slow rediscovery too.

In case that you know of any literature/websites/tutorials that show some of those workflows I'd be interested to dig into that!
Visit Pangaroo

2018-04-04, 15:04:11
Reply #10

bcgi

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Otherwise, just few classic tricks like placing blocking black walls if I wanted to taper the light and emphasise the direction.

Could you please explain that a little bit more maybe with a few rough examples? Are you using whole black wall pieces to block the light from a room to another or smaller pieces just to block some of the light or lets say multiple smaller pieces. I've heard about that method but I really would love to know how to use it and when.

Thank you in advance.
« Last Edit: 2018-04-04, 15:09:48 by bcgi »

2018-04-04, 15:29:53
Reply #11

Juraj

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Otherwise, just few classic tricks like placing blocking black walls if I wanted to taper the light and emphasise the direction.

Could you please explain that a little bit more maybe with a few rough examples? Are you using whole black wall pieces to block the light from a room to another or smaller pieces just to block some of the light or lets say multiple smaller pieces. I've heard about that method but I really would love to know how to use it and when.

Thank you in advance.

Have a look here, I posted example in my previous project thread. https://forum.corona-renderer.com/index.php?topic=17415.msg109258#msg109258
It can be of any size, position and angle. It is to simply stop the light from additional bounce, to preserve more direction to light giving more volumetric rendition of shapes or stronger shadows.

Or vice versa, bright wall/card to bounce additional light.

As said above, really stunning imagery! Congrats to this achievement!

I actually regret a lot not spending my early time in 3D building this sort of foundation, how to use spotlights, softboxes, bounce cards etc. So for me, it's slow rediscovery too.

In case that you know of any literature/websites/tutorials that show some of those workflows I'd be interested to dig into that!

Unfortunately I don't have any sources on hand or names that I would fully remember. From general art direction, there is a book about light and shading, that I somehow associate with Pixar.
There are few books concerning light and architecture.
And than there numerous sources from photography and cinematography, books, some master classes or even blogposts and youtube videos posted on Fstoppers.

I would gladly give you concrete names if I had any, but I am quite terrible with bookmarking. I need to make such source list for myself too.
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2018-04-04, 16:06:35
Reply #12

Tanakov

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I really like the lamp idea, what is the name of the company? I havent read all the post yet, so if this was asked please forgive me.

Nothing to say about the renders, its just your level. Good work mate.
Using Corona since 2014-01-02
https://www.behance.net/Gringott

2018-04-04, 16:28:03
Reply #13

bcgi

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Have a look here, I posted example in my previous project thread. https://forum.corona-renderer.com/index.php?topic=17415.msg109258#msg109258
It can be of any size, position and angle. It is to simply stop the light from additional bounce, to preserve more direction to light giving more volumetric rendition of shapes or stronger shadows.

Or vice versa, bright wall/card to bounce additional light.


Thank you.

I would gladly give you concrete names if I had any, but I am quite terrible with bookmarking. I need to make such source list for myself too.


You guys can try Mike Kelley's tutorials from F-stoppers. (He has 3 tutorials there)
https://fstoppers.com/product/mike-kelleys-where-art-meets-architecture-1

That what Juraj mentioned a couple of posts above.

2018-04-04, 16:35:00
Reply #14

Juraj

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You guys can try Mike Kelley's tutorials from F-stoppers. (He has 3 tutorials there)
https://fstoppers.com/product/mike-kelleys-where-art-meets-architecture-1

Heh I actually watched the second part of this series.
I would definitely endorse it for learning something new... but this is the style I have issue with. It's the exception I mentioned :- )

Quote
Some exception to this is american real-estate photography but I am not big fan of that style ("just point flashlight everywhere so there is no shadows at all").

It is definitely useful to watch..but I wouldn't follow those principles. In my opinion, like 70perc. of the work he showcases, looks better before. The American style is simply unnatural. I understand that when you sell million dollar houses, you need to show the view and minimize the shadows..but they go extremely overboard. They leave zero shadows, everything is oversaturated and the view outside looks like painted on.

That tutorial has extremely high production quality though. It's how every tutorial should be. I just don't like the content :- )
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