Author Topic: AI what are peoples thoughts ? I think we are in for big change.  (Read 3445 times)

2023-03-29, 03:01:07

JoeS

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Over the last 12 months I have been using and researching AI ie MJ, Dall E etc, and Archviz has been my career for the last 20 years. With the latest advancement's in AI tech, it seems to me the industry may no longer require 3D artists within the next 24 months. Revit now has AI implemented into the program at an early stage but with some amazing first steps. Also some Viz studios in Australia have started to produce renders that have a mixture of both 3D and AI. I have also recently seen multiple architects start to use AI also with amazing results. I guess what I am trying to say is I think Ai is going to change the whole game in my industry and many many more. Being able to produce images in a fraction of the time, cost and experience etc really is a game changer.

What are peoples thoughts on this ? It would be great to hear from the Chaos crew.

Cheers

2023-03-29, 10:15:36
Reply #1

romullus

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What are peoples thoughts on this ? It would be great to hear from the Chaos crew.

Rumour has it that entire Corona crew has been replaced by AI already...
I'm not Corona Team member. Everything i say, is my personal opinion only.
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2023-03-29, 10:28:12
Reply #2

Juraj

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I am fascinated by AI as well, in most positive way and I use ChatGPT almost semi-daily now. It's DEFINITELY NOT  gonna replace artists in next 24 months :- ). It might sweep the floor so to say as any tech advancement usually does, but it will continue to be cumbersome, require decent knowledge to use to best potential, and the best potential will stay to be "almost, but not exactly". Will not even touch the high-end part of industry (in negative way).

With the said..I wouldn't want to be a journalist or illustrator, that's for sure.
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2023-03-29, 11:28:12
Reply #3

Juraj

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Christ I just logged into LinkedIn after 5 years and it's 99perc. AI renderings on Front Page :- DDD Total Apocalypse.
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2023-03-29, 11:46:00
Reply #4

dj_buckley

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Over the last 12 months I have been using and researching AI ie MJ, Dall E etc, and Archviz has been my career for the last 20 years. With the latest advancement's in AI tech, it seems to me the industry may no longer require 3D artists within the next 24 months. Revit now has AI implemented into the program at an early stage but with some amazing first steps. Also some Viz studios in Australia have started to produce renders that have a mixture of both 3D and AI. I have also recently seen multiple architects start to use AI also with amazing results. I guess what I am trying to say is I think Ai is going to change the whole game in my industry and many many more. Being able to produce images in a fraction of the time, cost and experience etc really is a game changer.

What are peoples thoughts on this ? It would be great to hear from the Chaos crew.

Cheers

Those companies in Australia are simply uploading their own existing CGI's and adding some extra prompts to generate fresh images in the style of their own work.  So in that respect it's pretty meaningless.  The only benefit padding your portfolio with something you've technically not made, knowing that potential clients won't query it.

It's a great tool for concepting and creating reference, but at the minute not much beyond that. When it starts to take clients 3d models and very very specific instructions, i.e. drop the ceiling 250mm, add uplighters to every other column and change that chair and move it 500mm to the left rotated slightly towards camera.  That's when we need to start looking at how to leverage it to keep getting paid.

Going back to 'taking client 3d models" even then you're relying on the clients models, which we all know isn't always their strong point.

There are loads of other instances in my day to day work that I currently can't do with AI.

Remember when Lumion/Twinmotion were meant to make the industry obsolete?

I'm still not sure where I stand on ethics of it all, with it being trained on stolen content and all that.

2023-03-29, 15:19:16
Reply #5

lupaz

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I'm currently using AI for inspiration, and I see the potential for texture generation or background skies for example.
I can see it saving us a lot of the time we spend googling for the right images.
But I don't see it replacing viz artists in two years.
Although, I can see there being less work for freelancers if those who work in-house can have the same workload done in half the time.

Revit creating it's own AI renderings is going to happen. It's a matter of when.
I say in five years we'll start seeing semi-real time renderings in Revit with AI. Not perfect but close enough to not spend $1000s for a freelancer.

2023-03-29, 18:22:57
Reply #6

maru

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The text presents an interesting perspective on the impact of AI on the archviz industry. Two possible views on this topic are as follows:

View 1: AI will revolutionize the industry

Advocates of this view may argue that AI has the potential to transform the archviz industry, making it faster, cheaper, and more accessible. They may point to the examples cited in the text, such as Revit's early implementation of AI and Australian Viz studios producing renders with a mixture of 3D and AI, as evidence of the technology's impact. They may also suggest that AI can automate certain aspects of the 3D visualization process, reducing the need for human intervention and allowing for greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Moreover, they may see AI as a game-changer that could enable architects and designers to create better, more realistic designs that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional 3D rendering techniques. Overall, advocates of this view may believe that AI will revolutionize the archviz industry and usher in a new era of creativity and innovation.

View 2: AI cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists

Opponents of this view may argue that while AI can automate certain aspects of the 3D visualization process, it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists. They may suggest that AI lacks the ability to understand context, interpret complex design briefs, and make creative decisions based on intuition and experience. Moreover, they may point out that AI is only as good as the data it is trained on, and that it may struggle to produce truly unique or innovative designs without the input of human artists. In this view, AI is seen as a tool that can augment and enhance the skills of human artists, but not replace them entirely. Therefore, opponents of this view may argue that while AI may have a significant impact on the archviz industry, it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists, and that artists will continue to play a vital role in the design process.

In conclusion, the text presents a thought-provoking perspective on the impact of AI on the archviz industry. While some may see AI as a game-changer that will revolutionize the industry, others may argue that it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists. Ultimately, the extent to which AI will impact the industry remains to be seen, and it will likely depend on a variety of factors, including the development of the technology, the availability of data, and the preferences of clients and designers.
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2023-03-29, 18:25:23
Reply #7

dj_buckley

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The text presents an interesting perspective on the impact of AI on the archviz industry. Two possible views on this topic are as follows:

View 1: AI will revolutionize the industry

Advocates of this view may argue that AI has the potential to transform the archviz industry, making it faster, cheaper, and more accessible. They may point to the examples cited in the text, such as Revit's early implementation of AI and Australian Viz studios producing renders with a mixture of 3D and AI, as evidence of the technology's impact. They may also suggest that AI can automate certain aspects of the 3D visualization process, reducing the need for human intervention and allowing for greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Moreover, they may see AI as a game-changer that could enable architects and designers to create better, more realistic designs that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional 3D rendering techniques. Overall, advocates of this view may believe that AI will revolutionize the archviz industry and usher in a new era of creativity and innovation.

View 2: AI cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists

Opponents of this view may argue that while AI can automate certain aspects of the 3D visualization process, it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists. They may suggest that AI lacks the ability to understand context, interpret complex design briefs, and make creative decisions based on intuition and experience. Moreover, they may point out that AI is only as good as the data it is trained on, and that it may struggle to produce truly unique or innovative designs without the input of human artists. In this view, AI is seen as a tool that can augment and enhance the skills of human artists, but not replace them entirely. Therefore, opponents of this view may argue that while AI may have a significant impact on the archviz industry, it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists, and that artists will continue to play a vital role in the design process.

In conclusion, the text presents a thought-provoking perspective on the impact of AI on the archviz industry. While some may see AI as a game-changer that will revolutionize the industry, others may argue that it cannot replace the creativity and skill of human artists. Ultimately, the extent to which AI will impact the industry remains to be seen, and it will likely depend on a variety of factors, including the development of the technology, the availability of data, and the preferences of clients and designers.

This response has a ChatGPT feel to it ????

2023-03-29, 18:34:58
Reply #8

Juraj

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Maru forgot prompt to make it sound authentic :- )
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2023-03-30, 03:39:19
Reply #9

JoeS

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Lol yeah very AI response !

Looking at the image prompt side of it I have seen some amazing portraits with MJ based off a basic photo. Also on the Ronen Bekerman facebook group was posted, what I think looks like a compelling introduction to this working from a white card image prompt. I have attached some images from the post and a portrait example. I think even if we where to use the AI as a starting point for a fast creative exploration before production, it really has some up sides. Plus I think this is really just the start.

Thoughts ?



 

2023-05-21, 02:42:19
Reply #10

frv

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AI in architecture will work the same way as design competitions with hundreds or even thousands of submissions.
The client gets caught up in the hassle of so much choice and wishes he had hired just one architect. Someone with some social skills to guide him or her through the whole proces of construction with the local officials and contractors.
That you can generate hundreds of versions of the same proposal has np purpose. It's like going to a restaurant with a menu of a thousand dishes. If one day AI in architecture will be really good it will show the one and best option. A bit like Google Maps showing you the best route with the shortest drive or the one most scenic.

2023-05-21, 09:06:07
Reply #11

Juraj

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A bit like Google Maps showing you the best route with the shortest drive or the one most scenic right into the lake ;- ).
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2023-05-22, 07:07:26
Reply #12

3DInteriors

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I approach the topic from the perspective of architectural visualization. In its current state, I see it as a Pinterest enhanced with artificial intelligence. My clients want to see an exact replica of their apartment or house, where the dimensions are accurate, the windows and doors are in the right place, the lighting is realistic, and so on. However, AI does not currently create scaled construction documentation. Not yet, anyway... So, it can create beautiful renderings based on concepts, but it doesn't perform actual interior design work. AI doesn't draw the building in Archicad, doesn't arrange the space, doesn't create construction plans, doesn't communicate comprehensive requirements with the client, or request quotes for built-in furniture, and so on. Humans are still needed, but I wouldn't give it more than 15 years. After that, I think clients will choose whether they need a machine or a human interior designer. However, I would gladly use AI with voice control integrated with Corona Renderer in the future. It can also likely accelerate the process of creating animations.

2023-05-22, 07:57:53
Reply #13

aaouviz

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A bit like Google Maps showing you the best route with the shortest drive or the one most scenic right into the lake ;- ).

I know this is likely an 'Office' reference... but still a bit disconcerting knowing you've been driving around Norway a lot recently. Are the machines still dry, Juraj?
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2023-05-22, 08:02:25
Reply #14

aaouviz

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... However, I would gladly use AI with voice control integrated with Corona Renderer in the future. It can also likely accelerate the process of creating animations.

Yes! That begs the question... does it make sense for Corona to make a big pivot? They have, what I would think is, a great foundation to be the company for arch-viz AI. Someone will develop a tool, eventually, for base-model in 3DSmax to AI-image in the very near future. Corona, with it's team, knowledge, client base should be the one to get in front.

In my opinion it should be a hybrid of the current max/c4d + corona set-up and AI. Ie; we can still do UVW mapping but rather than rendering it in the traditional sense Corona AI generates it based on our 'prompt' (aka, the uv mapping). Surely this would be the way?

Sorry to hijack the original post... this has just been on my mind a lot lately.
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