Author Topic: Northern Wisps  (Read 11417 times)

2018-04-30, 23:34:57
Reply #15

bartosz.domiczek

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Thank you, guys. That's really a heart-warming reaction.

cjwidd > there's a lot that I could elaborate on here. Generally, the transition was inspired by contemporary polycarbonate facades from Japan. I wanted this form to have a very uniform look on the outside (being some idealized reminiscence of an original shelter as well as contrasting with rough surrounding) while retaining subtle details on many levels of the surface. In the end, it's some unspecified fluoropolymer. Of course, one can argue that closing the direct view from the inside onto the spectacular surrounding is merely a mistake but frankly, there are many arguable solutions here and this project is mainly to be a fun with CGI; to build upon some slightly naive poetry. I just like to think about the inside as of the shelter besieged by the reckless nature during long, cold nights.

Technically, the mesh is from Marvelous Designer, refined in Zbrush. The corona material is made from scratch as the effect of a long testing with various lighting conditions. It has both translucency and some blurred refraction. Diffuse and translucency are combined from several textures of plastics from Megascans. There is also some smudgy dirt in glossiness and normal.

2018-05-01, 00:38:50
Reply #16

Erald

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You are heartless! How should we other peasants feel after seeing this...

2018-05-01, 08:53:27
Reply #17

Fluss

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Nothing to say except it's beautiful! I've seen the entry already but I'm blown away every time! Keep up the good work

edit: Did you plan to do a making-of? That would be great To see your approach on that one!

2018-05-01, 19:58:29
Reply #18

bartosz.domiczek

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Thank you!
Fluss> yes, I think I will make it. I just need to think about its form since the project is a bit too vast to cover it thoroughly.

2018-05-02, 00:51:39
Reply #19

lmerlos

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SO FUCKNG AMAZING

You should submit this to the CG Awards. Seriously.

2018-05-02, 15:20:28
Reply #20

VizRepublic

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Truly amazing stuff! Great Images!

2018-05-02, 16:59:15
Reply #21

clemens_at

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wow, really amazing.
how did you go about making the terrain?

2018-05-02, 17:53:38
Reply #22

Hadi

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2018-05-02, 18:37:27
Reply #23

bartosz.domiczek

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Thank you very much.

Quote
how did you go about making the terrain?

I will probably write more about it in some making-of. Especially that I'd probably change a few elements of the workflow. Generally speaking, there are background and foreground assets. The first one (ie. Thorsmork valley, some single mountains, rocky areas) were created from the scratch in world machine and sculpted a bit in zbrush. I prepared a bunch of scattering sets distributed according to the world machines maps but in the end, I turned them off because they were barely visible in the environment fog and simultaneously quite resource demanding while being rendered. The foreground terrains (the ones where all the environment assets, as well as the cabins themselves, were placed on) were started in low-poly in 3ds max. After getting the rough shape, I placed crucial elements (cabins, rock formations creating the cliffs, etc.) and continued high-poly detailing in their context (I also moved to zbrush for a while to get some extra tweaks but it wasn't that necessary because the low vegetation covered most of it).

2018-05-02, 20:14:45
Reply #24

Juraj

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Looking at your portfolio, I am very impressed by the amount of personal projects you manage to pump out.
It's rare to see such consistency and drive to do so.

I know this is mostly a personal quality, rather innate, but should you ever have time to write about how you go month-by-month about you CGI work I would be very interested.

Of course, you might just write "I am very disciplined" :- ), but even in that case you don't seem to suffer from quite common fatigue from the subject.

It's a thing that comes up lately a lot in discussions and I see that fatigue heavily on myself. Lately, instead of working on hobby project, I've rather play God of War.
talcikdemovicova.com  Website and blog
be.net/jurajtalcik   Our studio Behance portfolio
Instagram   Our studio Instagram, managed by Veronika

2018-05-03, 10:55:55
Reply #25

bartosz.domiczek

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I haven't played anything since Witcher 3 and I rather see my fatigue growing in this field. : ) I can only turn on a new game to appreciate some technical aspects and then instantly get this ineluctable pop in my head warning about wasting my time. On the other hand, I am quite the opposite of "disciplined" and I am genuinely wasting hours on ineffective indolence (I guess it doesn't switch that pop on).

But to answer your question about the source of my drive:
Firstly, I don't think that my commercial commissions are satisfying enough in terms of creativity. They are often rushed, with hectic deadlines, and require a lot of mediocre design work. I cannot complain but I would easily get burnt off if not for my personal projects. It's also not that long since I decided I would like to focus totally on arch-viz and I just need to craft my career a bit into that direction since my client base is at the moment pretty random, spanning from vfx industry to advertisement. 
Secondly, I have some constantly insatiate hunger for it. I get inspired a lot on a daily basis and my head is crowded with unrealized ideas. Making them come to life is still one of my biggest joys. I have also this kind of affliction that makes me really positive about the stuff I am currently working on and really negative as soon as it's finished. It may not sound that great but it really pushes me forward.
On the other hand, I am pretty impatient and try to work smart and fast. I buy, re-use, adapt, fake as much as possible, which is not my preference at all but I have learned to accept it. I look with some hints of envy at artists that create their intricate works entirely with their own hands in every crazy detail.
I must also admit in the end that I probably just work too much and it'd be much healthier if I did less. : )

2018-05-03, 11:06:03
Reply #26

Dionysios.TS

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Amazing work!!!!

2018-05-03, 14:43:18
Reply #27

clemens_at

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But to answer your question about the source of my drive:
Firstly, I don't think that my commercial commissions are satisfying enough in terms of creativity. They are often rushed, with hectic deadlines, and require a lot of mediocre design work. I cannot complain but I would easily get burnt off if not for my personal projects. It's also not that long since I decided I would like to focus totally on arch-viz and I just need to craft my career a bit into that direction since my client base is at the moment pretty random, spanning from vfx industry to advertisement. 
Secondly, I have some constantly insatiate hunger for it. I get inspired a lot on a daily basis and my head is crowded with unrealized ideas. Making them come to life is still one of my biggest joys. I have also this kind of affliction that makes me really positive about the stuff I am currently working on and really negative as soon as it's finished. It may not sound that great but it really pushes me forward.
On the other hand, I am pretty impatient and try to work smart and fast. I buy, re-use, adapt, fake as much as possible, which is not my preference at all but I have learned to accept it. I look with some hints of envy at artists that create their intricate works entirely with their own hands in every crazy detail.
I must also admit in the end that I probably just work too much and it'd be much healthier if I did less. : )

I gotta say that I can identify with all this very well. I personally havent really found a solution for me yet. I do have the same problems you descibe which often leave me exhausted and lacking the drive to do more.
Finding the balance between perfectionism and speed is another problem. Its also not what i want but I figuered latley that I have to accept it.
What I actually wanted to say is, you kind of hit the sweet spot in all this crazy complexity. Thats really something to be proud of. Well done once again!

2018-05-03, 20:26:30
Reply #28

melviso

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Excellent work. Love everything about it. I also do personal work as well mostly for practice and trying to achieve exactly what I want. I tend to create every intricate detail down to the tiniest in modelling and texturing everything by hand as this gives me complete control over the final look and feel of the completed work but when working with clients speed is also vital as well as managing assets efficiently. So faking stuff or reuse, re-adapt or buying isn't a bag thing. The end result is what matters. I think finding a balance on when and how is an important thing.

I myself am learning to not always use handpainted textures unless when necessary (although this has been very useful as I can now create very high res textures from scratch for any asset I need, no need to search for difficult to find textures, better understanding of how materials should look, how textures should look with respect to natural lighting), use premade models if I have to, maybe fake stuff if it's taking too much time (but I love my raw renders looking good with no post process so I tend to work towards everything looking nice and crisp straight from renderer especially lighting and materials). I think what u have is a practical skill which is enviable, if your end result looks as good as this. I remember reading somewhere that the maker of the Third and seventh, Alex Roman uses premade models,as he doesn't see the need in modelling something that is already available as its a waste of time, like wise Koola ue4. So they have more time to focus on creating great looking renders.
EDIT:  Alex Roman interview here:
https://evermotion.org/articles/show/8268/alex-roman-i-love-architecture
« Last Edit: 2018-05-06, 23:54:57 by melviso »

2018-05-07, 09:12:05
Reply #29

bartosz.domiczek

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Thanks for sharing your points of view. Creating a decent looking, neatly unwrapped model can be satisfying, especially when shared with the rest of the community. My problem is that even if I prepare something for myself, it so much tailored to fit just my needs that I'd be ashamed to make it available to the others. You summoned the name of Alex Roman and I really identify with his approach. On the other hand, I would also mention here Marek Denko as the person who seems to be the titan of labor at all levels of a project. I don't know him personally but (as for the fan) his personal works seem to be really persistent. I am also dazzled how he is able to pull out just the one and only perfect image. If I did all his work with the scene creation, I would probably not be able to resist to plug all the different HDRIs and rotate the sun like crazy. So I'd end up with about ten images (certainly couldn't choose the best) with a way less influence than his one. That would be so much fun though.